Musings of a Dinosaur

A Family Doctor in solo private practice; I may be going the way of the dinosaur, but I'm not dead yet.

Sunday, February 01, 2009

Silliness

A few weeks ago I got a call from a dear friend who was vacationing in Florida. Somehow, she said, the TSA had managed to lose her husband's pill box filled with a week of meds that had been locked into his checked baggage. Could I please please pretty please call them in to a local pharmacy. I did (they were all diabetes, hypertension and basic coronary artery disease meds; not a controlled substance among them) with pleasure.

This week she and her husband brought me a small gift to show their appreciation.

Today as I finally got around to clearing my tabletop, I noticed that the bag from the store they had gone to said "Hoi Paloi Gallery." And my mind went off into a game I sometimes play with myself.

What if the aforementioned gallery also sold large goldfish. Would they be:
  • Hoi Paloi koi
What if they were all male:
  • Hoi Paloi boy koi
What if they weren't Jewish:
  • Hoi Paloi goy boy koi
What if you wanted to play with them:
  • Hoi Paloi goy boy koi toy
What if they couldn't eat wheat? You'd have to feed them:
  • Hoi Paloi goy boy koi toy soy
You get the idea. I suppose the only response is:
  • Oy.

6 Comments:

At Sun Feb 01, 10:37:00 AM, Anonymous william the coroner said...

A mind is a terrible thing to waste.

 
At Sun Feb 01, 12:16:00 PM, OpenID crankylitprof said...

No joy for Illinois?

It is to annoy!

Perhaps you were full of poi.

(I'm vaguely surprised that your Hoi Paloi goy boy koi wasn't named Roy.)

 
At Sun Feb 01, 05:17:00 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Very funny post - but might I suggest that the next time they put the medication in the CARRY-ON luggage!

 
At Thu Feb 05, 02:54:00 AM, Blogger Ellen Kimball said...

Yes, but let's start with a more difficult word, say...

orange

:-)

Ellen K.

Warm regards from a language lover, age 69, and a retired female broadcaster. Actually, I think in letters, groups of letters, words and phrases.

Mother told me that, starting at about age 4, I recited the radio commercials of my youth for years to small groups of family members. The lyrics of long-gone popular music from the 1930, 40, and 50s spin in my brain spontantously.

I imagine that I might have been, under the right circumstances, one of the wealthy daughters of Richard Rodgers (of Broadway's Rodgers and Hammerstein). Mary and Linda Rodgers have narrated fascinating documentaries about their father on PBS. Their mother Dorothy also had a colorful life.

I don't know anything about Mary, but her younger sister, Linda, lives in Katonah, New York. She was also drawn to music, but eventually went along a medical path. Due to her own fear of the operating room, she decided to put together intricate electronic music, meditations and affirmations to soothe people awaiting surgery, then, during the surgery itself.

I appealed to her directly in the early 1990s at her home in Katonah, New York. She was kind enough to send me the two cassettes, and she asked my marketing advice on how she could get more sales for her product.

I don't recall what she charged me, but the cassettes arrived and they were wonderfully helpful to this anxious patient -- in doctors' and dentists' offices for years. More recently, I contacted her again when I was working with a CD player. On the second mailing, she sent them without any charge. In turn, I sent her a colorful about Broadway musicals.

I just had some hand surgery January 5 for a small synovial cyst using a local only. When I got to the day surgery suite, I refused to sign for any intravenous connections at all, assuring them that I would rest comfortably through the whole procedure. Now, Linda Rodgers' pre-surgery and general surgery music can be started up easily on my mp3 player.

Hats off to you people in medicine! Linda, if you're by any chance reading this, you've impacted my life as much as your talented Dad did!

 
At Thu Feb 05, 02:57:00 AM, Blogger Ellen Kimball said...

OK. There are five more Pacific minutes and then our wedding anniversary (36th) will be over.

Two very dark rhymes for children. My ten grandchildren never heard these.

Benji saw the bear
The bear saw Benji
The bear got bulgy
The bulge was Benji.

&&&&&&&&

Lucy saw the train
The train saw Lucy
The track got juicy
The juice was Lucy.

&&&&&&&

 
At Thu Feb 12, 10:51:00 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

..and if you have a phobia about large apartment buildings, and said phobia involves multiple psychiatric co-morbidities, you have a....

Complex complex complex.

Pattie, RN

 

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